Feb 012016
 
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Welcome to “Tips From Sticks-In-The-Mud Woodshop.” I am a hobbyist, not a professional, someone who loves woodworking, just like you do. I have found some better ways to accomplish tasks in the workshop and look forward to sharing those with you each month, as well as hearing your problem-solving ideas.

I have often said that the most valuable thing I took with me from my time in the Air Force was a concept of safety.  I especially am reminded of it at the beginning of an electrical repair.  When I was an Air Force microwave communications instructor, we never entered an equipment room without removing our rings and watches.  Having conductive parts attached to your body when working in the bowels of electronic equipment is never a good idea.

Air Force Technical Sgt. Dominick Maters showed me this trick back in the 1970s when we both worked in Jones Hall on Keesler AFB. A Twist-O-Flex watchband and a wedding ring make a secure pair in your pocket.

Air Force Technical Sgt. Dominicus Maters showed me this trick back in the 1970s when we both worked in Jones Hall on Keesler AFB. A Twist-O-Flex watchband and a wedding ring make a secure pair in your pocket.

When I turn on a grinder, I never do so until I have first protected my eyes.  Once, in college, I didn’t, and a piece of wire wheel flew out and embedded itself right in my left cornea.  Stupid.

Recently our youngest son sent a video of his own son sanding an axle for his Pinewood Derby car.  Without eye protection.  I was then inspired to purchase a potentially sight-saving gift for each of our four grandchildren, our two sons and our two daughters-in-love:  Eye safety for the whole family, regardless of age or gender.

Looking out for your children’s and grandchildren’s eyesight and safety gives a whole new meaning to “CARE” package.

Looking out for your children’s and grandchildren’s eyesight and safety gives a whole new meaning to “CARE” package.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home. Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

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