Molly Bagby

Mar 132014
 

marchwoodnewsHave you seen this month’s issue of Wood News Online? It’s chock full of woodworking projects, tips, tricks, and monthly deals, and we’ve got something for everyone this month!

Our guest contributor articles include:

Wee Workshop by Ray Whyte: Ray was unable to add any space to his house to build his workshop, so instead, he had to take the “wee” space he already had in his garage, and transform every square foot into a useful space.

Building a Wooden Square by Lee Laird: Lee, our regular reviewer of Lie-Nielsen Tools of the Month, wrote an incredible article on his process of building a wooden square, similar to one recently built by Christopher Schwarz.

How I Got Started Woodworking by Scott Stahl: After building a derby racer for his son, Scott was bitten by the woodworking bug and continued making new projects and building up his shop. In this article, Scott gives some tips to both the beginning and advanced woodworker, as well as a basic tip of how to pick out your first workbench.

Our regular ‘Show Us’ contributions include:

Show Us Your Shop: We go into the basement shop of Don Henderson in Orleans, Ontario, where he built his shop with a special focus on dust and noise control.

Show Us Your Woodworking: Take a look at Pat Ring’s variety of inlay projects including a lapsteel guitar with custom case and a veneer hall table, amongst other projects!

Show Us Your Woodcarving: Army veteran, David Tidwell, shares his duck-painting inspired carvings, which feature a variety of colorful fish and bird sculptures.

We’ve also got some great tips from our regular contributors, including:

The Down to Earth Woodworker: Steve gives some tips on replacing current shop lighting with LED lighting, some advice on using the Standard Detail Sanding Kit, and an update on the installation of his dust collection system.

Tips from Sticks in the Mud: Jim offers up some tips on both disposable and rechargeable batteries and which work best in each of your woodworking tools that require them.

We also highlighted several products this month including:

Lie-Nielsen Tool of the Month: The Froe- This wood splitter comes both large and small, and Lie-Nielsen has incorporated several advantageous features on both, to make it the tool to go to for all of your green wood splitting needs.

Book Review: Why We Make Things and Why it Matters- While this book doesn’t focus entirely on woodworking, it follows the evolution of the woodworker seeking to fill his soul through craft, and how to become a “master craftsman”.

Finishing Wood with Alan Noel: Alan discusses finish durability and 6 steps you can take to make your finish last a little bit longer!

All of this and even more in our March issue of Wood News Online.

Mar 112014
 

CLICK HERE to see Day 1

CLICK HERE to see Days 2, 3, 4

CLICK HERE to see Day 5

DAY 6: 

The tops of the leg tenons protruding through the seat are sawn off flush and the final smoothing of the seat is finished:

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With the chair sitting on a flat surface, the leg ends are marked to be cut off so the chair sits nice and level:

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The continuous arm is scraped smooth and a heat gun helps tweak the curve transition at the arm rest area:

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The holes for the two main arm support spindles are laid out and drilled:

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With the continuous arm set on the chair, a brace helps support and align the back portion of the bow back to determine the placement of the spindle holes in both the seat bottom and arm:

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CLICK HERE to go to Day 7.

Mar 102014
 

Over the past week, several woodworkers have come together in our Highland Woodworking classroom to build a continuous arm windsor chair with master chairmaker, Peter Galbert. We have been keeping track of their progress each day, which you can see below!

CLICK HERE to see Day 1

CLICK HERE to see Days 2-4

DAY 5: The stretchers for the legs are aligned and glued to the center stretcher. The stretcher assembly is then aligned and glued to just two legs, and then to the final two legs.  The entire leg assembly is removed from the seat one last time to make a saw kerf in the tenon of the top of each leg.  The legs will be inserted back into the seat and the wedges glued in to pin the legs to the seat bottom.

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The legs are glued and driven home into their final resting place on the seat bottom and the wedges are hammered into the saw kerf in the leg’s tenon, which spreads the tenon slightly to securely lock it in place:

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Here you can see the tenons protruding from the seat top.  They will be sawn flush and then faired smooth to blend with the seat top:

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CLICK HERE to see Day 6

CLICK HERE to go to Day 7

Mar 072014
 

To see Day 1 of the class, Build a Continuous Arm Windsor Chair with Peter Galbert, CLICK HERE

DAY 2:

Students are continuing their ride on the shave horses as they work to dimension and shape the 60" long continuous arm of the chair.

Students are continuing their ride on the shave horses as they work to dimension and shape the 60″ long continuous arm of the chair.

students are continuing their ride on the shave horses as they work to dimension and shape the 60" long continuous arm of the chair.

students are continuing their ride on the shave horses as they work to dimension and shape the 60″ long continuous arm of the chair.

Here is the arm completely secure on the bending form.  After a few days on the form, the arm will be dry and ready to be joined up to the soon to be created seat.

Here is the arm completely secure on the bending form. After a few days on the form, the arm will be dry and ready to be joined up to the soon to be created seat.

DAY 3:

Using angled mirrors (no smoke!) and reference guides set with the correct angles the student is able to drill the holes in the seat blank at the correct splay and rake needed for the chair to sit as designed:

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A tapered reamer is used in the angled hole to flair the inside of the hole to accept the tapered tenon of the leg. The tapered angle widens towards the floor so the seat bottom will wedge onto the leg tenon to help ensure a tight and long-lived joint.

A tapered reamer is used in the angled hole to flair the inside of the hole to accept the tapered tenon of the leg. The tapered angle widens towards the floor so the seat bottom will wedge onto the leg tenon to help ensure a tight and long-lived joint.

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Here is the seat bottom with the plan view outline and layout of the holes for the legs and spindles.

The four turned maple legs are inserted into the pine seat bottom for a test dry-fit.  Next comes fitting for the cross leg spindles.

The four turned maple legs are inserted into the pine seat bottom for a test dry-fit. Next comes fitting for the cross leg spindles.

DAY 4:

With scorp, travisher, drawknife and spokeshave, the shield-style shaped chair bottom is sculptued forth.  The seat is scooped out with the scorp and travisher and the unique outside shield pattern is created with the drawknife and spokeshave:

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CLICK HERE to go to Day 5

CLICK HERE to go to Day 6

CLICK HERE to go to Day 7

Mar 032014
 

This week, Highland Woodworking is hosting master chairmaker, Peter Galbert, who is teaching a 7-day class entitled Build a Continuous Arm Windsor Chair from March 3-9.

After Day 1, students have already made progress on building their own chairs, which they will get to take home at the end of the week:

chairclass1Students are holding their own on their horses while they pile up the shavings using drawknives on rived red oak stock, which will become the back spindles for the chair.

chairclass0314002Pictured above, you can see one student’s results from a good productive first day on the shave horse. A batch of chair back spindles roughed out and ready for the drying box. Once they lose some moisture, they will be pared down to final dimension.

CLICK HERE to go to Days 2,3, and 4

CLICK HERE to go to Day 5

CLICK HERE to go to Day 6

CLICK HERE to go to Day 7

Feb 282014
 

Today, we’re featuring two more woodworkers for Follow Friday and they are Don Schneider (Carving) and Paul Bucca (Woodturning).

Carving: Don Schneider

Don Schneider is a woodworker living in the northern woods of Havana, FL. He first got interested in carving after he used only an exacto knife and two wood files to carve a claw and ball foot, and was able to teach himself all of the carving techniques he needed to turn it into a regular hobby.

Don’s main focus in woodcarving is bas-relief carving, which he often does in a surrealist style. Another one of his carving interests is ornate masks. You can see several of his pieces below.

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You can read more about Don and see more of his carving in his Show Us Your Carving section of our February issue of Wood News Online.

Woodturning: Paul Bucca

Paul Bucca is a former Oceanographer who now enjoys creating segmented bowl turnings. Over the past 9 years that he has been turning, his segmented bowls have been getting more and more elaborate as he has gained skills in marquetry, and better tools.

One of his biggest pieces was featured in the Show Us Your Woodturning section of our February issue of The Highland Woodturner. The turning consists of 685 pieces making up two hemispheres that were finished and mated together to create a beautiful and elaborate porthole bowl seen below:

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Fridays on the Highland Woodworking Blog are dedicated to #FollowFriday, where we use this space to further highlight a woodworker or turner who we have featured in our monthly e-publications Wood News and The Highland WoodturnerWould you like for your shop or woodworking to appear in our publications? We invite you to SEND US PHOTOS of your shop or work along with captions and a brief history and description of your woodworking (Email photos at 800×600 resolution.) Receive a $50 store credit redeemable towards merchandise if we show your shop in a future issue.

Feb 212014
 

Today, we’re giving you not one, but TWO Follow Friday’s! Every month we feature several woodworkers within our online publications, Wood News Online and The Highland Woodworker, where they each have a column devoted to a woodworking specialty. These specialties include Shop Design, Woodworking, Carving, and Turning. Want us to showcase your own shop or projects? Check out the end of this column to see how you can submit to our newsletters!

For February 2014 we are featuring the following woodworkers:

shop1smShow Us Your Shop: Jim Brown has a beautiful woodsy shop in Old Forge, NY, where he sometimes has wildlife visitors while working (see the deer in the photo on the left?). Some unique characteristics of Jim’s shop include:

  • Plywood walls to allow easy installation of shelves and hangars.
  • A Sawstop Cabinet Saw (which makes him feel much safer when ripping stock).
  • 10 foot high ceilings, which allow easy swinging and handling of long boards.
  • Shelves with angled fronts that allow easy clamp storage and which also keep items from falling.
  • A self-fashioned system to easily move his non-mobile lathe.
  • A sturdy, fold-down set of stairs that can be lifted with just one finger.
  •  An attic used for wood storage.

To find out more about Jim’s shop and to view pictures of some of his mechanisms, CLICK HERE.

Show Us Your Woodworking: Mike Stafford has been fascinated with woodworking for much of his life, and is now at a point in life where he gets to do it as an everyday hobby! Mike and his wife, Kathie, built their kitchen together after Kathie created the design and Mike did the actual construction. After the kitchen, they decided to redo their bedroom furniture including nightstands and dressers, made of a variety of woods, finishes, and hardware. Most recently, they designed a 3-part Credenza to store all of their old movies in their living room.

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The top drawer is straight grained walnut cut in a serpentine pattern which shows off the vertical lines in the wood. The lower two drawers have an outside ‘frame’ in very uniform grained walnut sapwood. A maple inlay sets off the book matched walnut crotch wood as the inside face of the drawer frame.

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The dresser drawers are all book matched crotch wood. The drawer details in the night stand drawer fronts are the same in the dressers as in the nightstands. The hardware on the flat drawers is original 1930’s Art Deco Bakelite with bronze metal.

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Each bank of drawers on the Credenza is book matched and the faces have incredible depth. We found some drawer pulls in matte bronze with an art deco design impressed on them. The finish is Arm-R-Seal wipe on finish.

To find out more about the wood, hardware, and techniques that Mike used on his bedroom and living room furniture projects, CLICK HERE to go to the article!

Stay tuned next Friday, when we feature our Carving and Turning columnists for February!

Fridays on the Highland Woodworking Blog are dedicated to #FollowFriday, where we use this space to further highlight a woodworker or turner who we have featured in our monthly e-publications Wood News and The Highland WoodturnerWould you like for your shop or woodworking to appear in our publications? We invite you to SEND US PHOTOS of your shop or work along with captions and a brief history and description of your woodworking (Email photos at 800×600 resolution.) Receive a $50 store credit redeemable towards merchandise if we show your shop in a future issue.