Highland Staff

May 052020
 

In the May 2020 issue of Wood News, Doug Stowe shares some great tips for involving kids in your woodworking.

Since kids have been spending more time learning from home, it is important to still be able to emphasize a hands-on learning approach. What better way to do that than have your kids join you in your workshop!

Click here to read tips for getting kids into woodworking

Apr 232020
 

In the April 2020 issue of Wood News, John Wolf shares his process for a unique woodworking project: the spinning top.

Spinning tops are often the first project taught to new turners, particularly if they are 12 or younger. Some of us are still fascinated by tops even though that 12 year old mark was passed many decades ago. John Wolf recently started making singing tops. These are tops that make a resonate note as they spin.

Click here to learn how to make a spinning top

Apr 212020
 

Some years back, before he actually purchased a SawStop for his shop, Steve Johnson (the Down to Earth Woodworker) decided to do some deep thinking and some calculations to determine if the SawStop would be worth the price.

I know first hand what an excellent table saw feels like, sounds like, and how it performs. I know their value. So how could SawStop, at slightly less money, but with an expensive safety feature added, possibly perform as well? The price/value equation seemed skewed and it had me stymied.

Click here to read the rest of Steve’s article!

Apr 092020
 

For the April 2020 issue of Wood News Online, Norm Reid reviewed Craig Thibodeau’s excellent guide, The Craft of Veneering:

I’ve recently become interested in delving into the practice of incorporating veneer into some of my projects. To get started in this, I’ve read several books on veneering. While each has its strong points, none, in my opinion, is as complete an introduction to veneering as The Craft of Veneering by Craig Thibodeau.

Read the rest of the review

Purchase your own copy of The Craft of Veneering

Click this link for more great woodworking books to read

Apr 072020
 

In his new column in the April 2020 issue of Wood News, Bob Rummer shares how woodworking can affect four key dimensions of our mental health and well-being.

I have written about some of the psychological benefits of woodworking before, how shop time can help us manage anxiety and stress and contribute to a more positive outlook on life. As I think about our current situation let me share how woodworking can affect four key dimensions of our mental health and well-being.

Click here to read more about woodworking can affect your mental health

Apr 032020
 

First of all, we would like to thank everyone who is working in the medical fields, trucking, retail sales, manufacturing, delivery, sanitation and every other essential worker out there for all of their services they are continuing to provide during these times.

A lot of us, who aren’t in these fields, have more than likely found some extra time on our hands that we would normally be using commuting to work, socializing with friends and family, or attending sports practice. For a lot of people, this has been newfound time to start a new hobby or get better at something you have already been pursuing….like woodworking.

Is the shop calling?

There are also those of us who have kids and are now doing double duty as both parents and teachers. Now could be a good time to add shop class into your child’s schedule. Not only is it teaching them new skills but it gets you into the shop!

This month we want to ask how are you spending your time around the house? And if it’s not listed in the poll, feel free to comment on this blog post!

Mar 132020
 

In the March 2020 issue of Wood News, we featured an article by first time Wood News writer Andy Glenn, all about the Drawknife. How to sharpen it, how to use it, and more:

Of all the hand tools, I think the drawknife can be the most intimidating – especially if you’ve never picked one up before. There’s something about the simplicity of the tool that makes it appear so challenging. It’s just a blade with two handles. There are no added controls, adjustments, knobs, buttons, batteries or lasers – it’s just the blade and your skill that make it work.

Click here to read more