Highland Staff

Aug 102021
 

For the July 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Norm Reid reviewed Woodworker’s Pocket Book:

Woodworker’s Pocket Book is quite different from the usual fare of woodworking books. It is a pocket reference compiled by Charles H. Hayward, longtime editor of the British magazine, The Woodworker, and draws on his extensive and comprehensive knowledge of woodworking tools and materials.

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Aug 052021
 

For the August 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Bob discusses a popular topic that often comes up during this time of year…. managing the temperature in your workshop during hot and humid summer months.

These are the Dog Days of Summer, and this summer is breaking records. Kalispell, Montana, just west of Glacier National Park, topped the 100-degree mark in June. When you can fry an egg on your tablesaw it makes me think about two things: 1) should you use cooking spray on your tablesaw when you fry eggs, and 2) how do we manage temperature in the woodshop?

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Jul 292021
 

For the July 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Temple Blackwood discusses the turning process of cups and tumblers and the “lesson plan” he has come up with to make it a quick and exciting presentation for museum guests watching his woodturning demonstrations.

Woodturning demonstrations, such as we do at the Wilson Museum each summer in July and August, are relatively efficient from start-to-finish, and both attract and engage an audience. The speedy process of “unwrapping” a square-cut or full-bark piece of wood with a chisel and revealing a useful object within, sometimes with unexpected natural figure, while the on-lookers observe can be nearly miraculous, a trick of hand-and-eye with the speed and fascination of an accomplished magician performing.

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Jul 272021
 

For the July 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Bob Rummer discusses cognitive spatial ability and how it plays a role throughout the woodworking process from mentally designing and planning to actually putting pieces together.

While I grew up playing with Tinker Toys, Erector Sets and blocks (all good spatial training), my formal education in spatial skills really came in junior high shop class. Mr. Westphal taught the first shop course, Mechanical Drawing, in 7th grade. We learned how to write block letters and use triangles and T-squares. However the key skill development was how to visualize objects.

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Jul 222021
 

For the April 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Temple Blackwood wrote about the different types of spindle turning tools, and how they all work together with a woodturner’s skills to create something (or many things) both beautiful and functional:

One of the most satisfying reasons to hone spindle turning skills is the confidence the turner gains when turning multiple sets of chair and table legs to complete a project or turning stepped candlesticks, thin finials, or five to several hundred balusters.

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Jul 152021
 

For the June 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Temple discusses the emergence of the free-form approach to woodturning:

Another approach to woodturning, which has become an interesting study in emerging art over the past sixty years during woodturning’s rebirth, is a free-form approach to making a variety of objet d’art which might or might not have a useful purpose. The impressive emergence of the American Association of Woodturners, the Center for Art in Wood, dedicated galleries, shows, woodturning schools, and a number of new museums that celebrate woodturning artist/sculptors and the variety of blended or multi-media turned art forms is testament to the creative excitement.

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Jul 132021
 

For the June 2021 issue of Wood News Online, Norm Reid reviewed The Workbench Book:

The Workbench Book, a survey of many workbench types as designed and used by their builders, is a classic in woodworking literature. It gives the reader an encyclopedic view of the possibilities for creating a workspace tailored to one’s own requirements and so much more.

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