Highland Staff

Feb 082017
 

dovetails1smIn this month’s issue of Wood News, Amy Herschleb writes about her own journey learning how to cut a dovetail by hand. Amy is a staff writer for Highland and a relative beginner to woodworking, but her current surroundings working at the Highland Woodworking retail store make for a perfect environment to immerse herself in all things woodworking and learn various ways of approaching the basics.

Amy will be providing a beginner’s take on a number of different woodworking topics, including joinery, sharpening, hand planes, carving and much more. Keep your eye out here for more articles to come!

In the meantime, you can read about Amy’s entertaining exploration into different ways of cutting a dovetail.

Feb 032017
 

davidbarronIf you are struggling to get a good fit on your dovetails with a handsaw, the Barron Magnetic Dovetail Saw Guide can help. Use the guide as an assist if you are just starting in your dovetailing, or keep it in your toolbox for foolproof angle cutting even when you have your technique down.

In the video below, Mike Morton takes a closer look at the Barron Guide, demonstrating how it works and showing us the best way to use it to cut pins and tails on your next set of dovetails. If you have been frustrated in your attempts to cut close-fitting dovetails, try the Barron Magnetic Dovetail Saw Guide, available at Highland Woodworking.

Feb 012017
 

If you are overwhelmed by all of the choices for sharpening and honing your plane irons and chisels, we can help. In the video below, Justin Moon takes a closer look at the many different options for sharpening, including water stones, diamond plates, oil stones, ceramic stones, sandpaper and more.

Watch the video to learn pros and cons of each sharpening method, and get started sharpening with confidence in your own shop today.

Jan 242017
 

Have you ever flattened your workbench? If you have an old bench top that has endured a lot of use, it might be time to return the top to flat so you can maintain the accurate reference surface that so many of us need from our workbenches.

In this video, Morton walks through the process of returning a workbench to flat, using a Jointer Plane, a Sander and a Jack Plane. Take a look and get your own workbench back to flat today!

Dec 092016
 

A few weeks ago we got an email from a customer who wanted to share his “Pay It Forward” story for the holidays, but wanted to remain anonymous. Here is his story about how he sold all of the tools in his shop to a military veteran for just $1:

It would be an honor to me for you to share my story of my experience (with this fine young man and my soldier friend) of talking for several hours with a returned soldier and then selling my woodworking shop’s tools, machinery, and all contents/everything to him for a dollar and a handshake.

If you don’t mind, please don’t share my name or contact information. I share my story with you to let everyone know that for me paying a little back to a young man who fought for me, and for all of us, was much better than the money I could have made by selling my shop’s contents to someone who wouldn’t have appreciated either this young man’s sacrifice and service or the tools themselves. I could have made a lot of needed cash selling everything I had (it was several truck loads, but it was worth much more to me to have made a new friend and to help a soldier whom I had never met, but will never forget.

My wife didn’t understand at first my decision to sell everything I had for so little because she knew how much time and money I had put into this shop. After she met him and got to know him, she understood my decision completely.

-Anonymous

Oct 262016
 

img_4062We were very excited to listen to Popular Woodworking’s Megan Fitzpatrick interviewing Nick Offerman last week. Among the many topics they discussed were Peter Galbert’s mean turkey stew, the similarities between building boats and building acoustic instruments, Nick’s shop in Los Angeles, and of course, his new book: Good Clean Fun, on sale now at Highland Woodworking.

 

On the topic of why he is a woodworker, Nick said:

I can feel the health coursing through my soul by getting to my bench and saying “Okay, how can I mess up this piece of walnut.”

And Megan is right – his chuckle is absolutely infectious. Well worth a listen.

The original article

Not long after the Popular Woodworking article came out, we were excited to receive an in-person visit from Nick at our store in Atlanta. Like many of our visitors, Nick described visiting Highland Woodworking “like being a kid in a candy store” after he took a tour of the store including our woodworking classroom.

Thank you for making our day with your visit, Nick. And for representing our craft in such an entertaining way.

 

Oct 192016
 

We were honored to have a visit from renowned carver Chris Pye a few weeks ago. Chris taught a 3-hour sharpening seminar in the morning to a roomful of enthusiastic carvers, and the demonstration was filled with entertaining anecdotes and carving references. We were very impressed with Chris’s ability to make good fun out of a sharpening demo.

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In the afternoon, Chris opened up the classroom and welcomed all carvers to come in to discuss all things woodcarving in an open house forum. Attendees were urged to bring in their own work to show off or ask technique questions, and a wonderful afternoon was had by all.

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Thank you to Chris and Carrie Pye for making the journey to Highland – sharing talent like yours to our woodworking community is a very special opportunity for us and we always appreciate it.

Keep an eye out for our in-depth interview with Chris Pye, coming to this blog very soon!

In the meantime, you can learn more about Chris Pye and even sign up for online carving lessons at his website: www.chrispye-woodcarving.com